Zucchini Week: Zucchini Garlic Rolls

Zucchini week continues.  Baking with zucchini is a common way to sneak it into all sorts of things people like to eat.  There’s an infamous chocolate cake in my family.  My mom made a fantastic chocolate cake that my sister and I devoured.  Only later (I swear it was months later, but this story tends towards melodramatic) did we discover that our mom had tricked us and put vegetables in the dessert!  Who would do such a thing to a perfectly good chocolate cake?  I’ve since outgrown indignant, and I’ve come to be quite impressed with her craftiness. 

Massive_zucchini

This recipe isn’t nearly as crafty.  You can easily tell that there is zucchini in these rolls just by looking at them, but as zucchini is such an innocuous vegetable it sneaks easily and unobtrusively into any number of recipes.  These zucchini garlic rolls were inspired by the (never home) maker blog’s Ring-O-Fire Garlic Knots.  I’ve made the original as well as a couple of variations on my zucchini version, and they’re all great.  Definitely check out their original recipe.  Mine are rolls instead of knots because I lack any sort of dough-knot-forming skills.

zucchini_garlic_rolls

Zucchini Garlic Rolls inspired by (never home)maker

You won’t even notice the zucchini in these rolls, but you’ll appreciate another opportunity to use up some more of that prolific squash.

Dough

  • 1 cup of water (warm to the touch)
  • 2 tbsp maple syrup (or honey or agave)
  • 2 tsp yeast
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • 1/2 cup shredded zucchini
  • 2 tsp salt
  • 1 cup spelt flour
  • 2 cups bread flour

Topping

  • 1/4 cup olive oil
  • 2 cloves of garlic, diced
  • 2 tbsp jalapeno, diced
  1. Preheat your oven to 400 (or 410 if you have a special Ikea oven)
  2. Mix the maple syrup into the warm water, and then add the yeast.  If the water is too hot you’ll kill the yeast instead of just waking them up, so err on the side of cooler.  Give this 5-10 minutes for the yeast to wake up.
  3. In a separate large bowl, sift together the salt, spelt flour and bread flour.
  4. Add the olive oil and shredded zucchini to the wet ingredients and mix.
  5. Pour the wet ingredients into the dry ingredients and mix. 
  6. When the dough starts to come together, coat your hands with olive oil and knead it for a few minutes.  It should come together into a smooth ball with a shiny surface.
  7. Take a clean, oiled bowl (just put some olive oil on a paper towel and rub it around the inside of the bowl) and place the dough in it to rise.
  8. Cover the bowl with a dish towel (especially important if you have curious cats), and put it in a warm place to rise for 2-3 hours.
  9. Divide the dough evenly and roll it into 12 small balls (or twist into knots if you’re talented)
  10. Bake for 12 minutes, or until golden brown.
  11. While the rolls are baking, pour the 1/4 cup of olive oil in the bottom of a small bowl, and add the diced garlic and jalapeno to this bowl.
  12. Once the rolls are cool enough to touch, dunk the top of the roll in the bowl with the olive oil and your toppings. 
  13. Set back on the pan to cool for another few minutes before enjoying.

These rolls are a blank canvas for the toppings.  The garlic and jalapenos were great, but they’d also be great with garlic and parmesan cheese, or perhaps some garlic and chopped rosemary.

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2 Responses to Zucchini Week: Zucchini Garlic Rolls

  1. Pingback: Zucchini Week: Zucchini Banana Muffins | Boston to Berkeley

  2. Pingback: Our Berkeley Garden: Month Three Update | Boston to Berkeley

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